Journal of Clinical Neonatology

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2022  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 13--18

Respiratory patterns in neonates hospitalized with brief resolved unexplained events


Maliheh Kadivar1, Razieh Sangsari1, Maryam Saeedi1, Kayvan Mirnia2, Mahbod Kaveh3, Mohammad Reza Maleki1, Rangarirai Makuku4 
1 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Children's Medical Center, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Children's Medical Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
3 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Bahrami Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
4 Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Kayvan Mirnia
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Children's Medical Center, School of Medicine, Tehran; University of Medical Sciences, Tehran
Iran

Objective: The objective of this study is aimed at investigating and evaluating respiratory patterns between infants hospitalized with brief resolved unexplained event (BRUE) and the control group. Methods: A convenient sampling method was used to select 52 patients presented at an urban, tertiary, and teaching pediatric hospital fitting the American Academy of Pediatrics' criteria of a lower-risk BRUE from December 2019 to December 2020. A random probability sampling method was used to select 52 patients as a control group. A NINIX apnea monitoring device was used to record respiratory time patterns and analyzed with SPSS 25. Results: A total of 104 participants participated in the study. Our study found that inspiration time (0.31 ± 0.04), expiratory time (0.93 ± 0.14), respiratory rate (38.48 ± 4.38), body temperature (37.11 ± 0.20), and heart rate (137.90 ± 6.60) were not statistically different between both groups. Mean birth weight in the control group and BRUE were respectively (3.43 ± 0.39, 3.23 ± 0.35). Mean gestational age in the control and BRUE groups were respectively (38.94 ± 1.01, 39.0 ± 1.04). Mean postnatal age in the control and BRUE groups were respectively (17.19 ± 6.07, 17.32 ± 7.35). Birth weight (P = 0.08) was statistically significant between both groups. In one patient, we recorded breath arrest for more than 20 s. Conclusion: There were no significant differences in respiratory patterns between infants hospitalized with BRUE and the control group. Low birth weight and low APGAR score are possible risk factors for infants experiencing BRUE, and more investigations are required to establish underlying causes.


How to cite this article:
Kadivar M, Sangsari R, Saeedi M, Mirnia K, Kaveh M, Maleki MR, Makuku R. Respiratory patterns in neonates hospitalized with brief resolved unexplained events.J Clin Neonatol 2022;11:13-18


How to cite this URL:
Kadivar M, Sangsari R, Saeedi M, Mirnia K, Kaveh M, Maleki MR, Makuku R. Respiratory patterns in neonates hospitalized with brief resolved unexplained events. J Clin Neonatol [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Jan 16 ];11:13-18
Available from: https://www.jcnonweb.com/article.asp?issn=2249-4847;year=2022;volume=11;issue=1;spage=13;epage=18;aulast=Kadivar;type=0